Armond White on the reception of Julie Dash’s film “Daughters Of The Dust”, John Singleton’s film “Boyz N The Hood”, and Wendell B. Harris’s film “Chameleon Street” (QUOTE from the Armond White book “The Resistance: Ten Years of Pop Culture That Shook Up The World”)

 

68 – Armond White on the reception of Julie Dash’s Daughters Of The Dust, John Singleton’s Boyz N The Hood, and Wendell B. Harris’s Chameleon Street   -1992-

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daughters of The Dust has become a hit by appealing to the

 

 

frustrations of women who feel left out of the African-American art competition.  This serious, hard working group is concentrated in New York in enough numbers to make Julie Dash’s feature-length debut a bigger local hit then it is ever likely to be anywhere else in the country.  Once again, New York has a disproportionate influence on the national cultural temper.  This is good to the extent that it might shed light on the efforts of other African-American woment who are putting up a mighty struggle to express themselves in film or video.  Yet, this too…”

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Two day before John Singleton became the first Black person nominated for an Academy Award as Best Director, I pointed out to a friend the minimal display of craft in John Singleton’s Remember The Time music video for Michael Jackson.  Instead of showing the stages of the stickman’s trick, John Singleton cut to a slave girl watching the stick’s ascension.  That cut amounts to basic cinematic skill; it extends the meaning of an action by implying its continuance and adds a point of view to the audience’s own. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Singleton’s work in Boyz N The Hood is, at best, similarly skilled and functional and –at times–expressive.  Still, the Oscar nomination for Boyz N The Hood seems to…”

 

 

 

 

 

Chameleon Street should have enjoyed the celebration that attended Boyz N The Hood and Daughters Of The Dust, but it was scuttled by the lack of mainstream pressure (i. e., hype).  But the film has true merit: Wendell B. Harris’s  weird, daring, provocative investigation of the modern American psyche make Daughters of The Dust and Boyz N The Hood look like trivial gestures of children.  Chameleon Street makes adult demands on viewers by…”

 

 

 

To read more of Armond White’s take on the reception of Julie Dash’s Daughters Of The Dust film, John Singleton’s Boyz N The Hood film and Wendell B. Harris’s Chameleon Street film; purchase a new or used copy of The Resistance: Ten Years of Pop Culture That Shook The World.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: